Posted 1 month ago
Posted 1 month ago
You cannot enslave a mind that knows itself. That values itself. That understands itself.
Professor Wangari Maathai (via specialnights)
Posted 1 month ago
The universe is under no obligation to make sense to you.
Neil deGrasse Tyson (via likeafieldmouse)

(Source: robscharf)

Posted 1 month ago

Metallic gold skull painting by Claire Dempsey on Etsy

Posted 1 month ago

Am I the only one that thinks turtle skulls look like they’ve been left behind by deceased Pokemon?

Taken at the Ulster Museum, Belfast

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Posted 2 months ago

'Mars' - oil on board by Claire Dempsey 

Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun. Named after the Roman god of war, and often described as the “Red Planet” due to its reddish appearance. Interestingly, other ancient cultures also focused on colour 

Etsy 

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Posted 2 months ago

'Eternity' - Oil on Canvas by Claire Dempsey

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“From my rotting body flowers shall grow and I am in them and that is eternity” - Edvard Munch

This painting was inspired by an interesting paradox; that we are both temporary and eternal.

See, the universe is very old, 13.8 billion years old to be precise. It might be easier for us to imagine just how long that period of time is if we were to condense it down into just one year. The Big Bang happens on the 1st of January but it takes until September for our solar system to even begin to form. Humans won’t appear until December 31st, with modern civilization only occupying the last 14 seconds of the year! The universe had been around for a staggeringly long amount of time before we humans ever evolved. However, the interesting thing is that although we haven’t been around for very long in our human form, the elements that compose our bodies, the ‘stuff’ we are made of, has.  

You may or may not have already heard the idea that our bodies are made of ‘star dust’. What is meant by this is that the elements that make up the human body were first formed billions of years ago in the immense heat of exploding stars. Carl Sagan explained that “The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies, were all made in the interiors of collapsing stars.”

If you think about it, on the smallest level, we are all just different arrangements of atoms. But atoms didn’t appear out of nowhere for our exclusive use. The atoms that make up your body now were in existence thousands of years ago, just in a different form. Some of the atoms in your right hand were in plants, some in animals, and some were in other people, and millions of years before that they were in planets and stars. Likewise, they will not simply evaporate when we die. They will be recycled into the earth, dispersed and used again in other ways, eventually ending up in other plants and animals as well as inanimate objects. Atoms are continually being passed around and reused. Our current form is only very temporary, especially when you think about our lifespan compared to the vast age of the universe, but what we are made of has been around for longer than we can imagine. We have always been here, just not in this particular arrangement.

“Nothing retains it’s form; new shapes from old.

Nature, the great inventor, ceaselessly contrives. In all creation, there is no death –

No death but only change and innovation;

What we people call birth is but a different new beginning; death is but to cease to be the same.

Perhaps this may have moved to that and that to this, yet the sum of things remains the same.”

Ovid, Metamorphoses

Posted 3 months ago

Working on the ‘flame nebula’ today. Is there anything more fascinating and beautiful than images of deep space? Oil on board (unfinished)

Posted 3 months ago
There’s as many atoms in a single molecule of your DNA as there are stars in the typical galaxy. We are, each of us, a little universe.
Neil deGrasse Tyson, Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey (Ep 2: Some of the Things that Molecules Do)

(Source: ckerouac)

Posted 3 months ago
The quest for knowledge and understanding never gets dull. It’s actually the opposite; the more you know, the more amazing the world seems. It’s the crazy possibilities, the unanswered questions that pull us forward.
Posted 3 months ago

Day 2 of painting this misty brain. I’m not sure what I will call this painting yet. It’s quite different from the last few I’ve made!

I was inspired by the online neuroscience course I’m taking as well as the Buddhist notion of impermanence, hence the fading around the edges.

It is still unfinished and I will upload more images as it progresses. If you like you can follow me on Facebook: www.facebook.com/clairedempseyphoto Or Twitter: www.twitter.com/ClaireD_Artist

Posted 3 months ago
Posted 4 months ago

sagansense:

jump-suit:

An annotated map of the moon documenting layers of knowledge about the moon from the earliest moon drawings in caves to Gallileo’s telescope to traditional folklore to the moon landings and further. Completed in ink on mountboard.

By Helen Cann

One of many reasons why the A for ART in STEAM is necessary and relevant across all platforms of science. So cool and a wonderful illustrative idea.

Posted 4 months ago
The quest for knowledge and understanding never gets dull. It’s actually the opposite; the more you know, the more amazing the world seems. It’s the crazy possibilities, the unanswered questions that pull us forward.
Posted 4 months ago

humanoidhistory:

The planet Saturn, brought to you by the Hubble Space Telescope.